Paul Bliss sues CTV and others. Does #MeToo's power extend to the courtroom?

Former CTV reporter Paul Bliss is suing CTV, his initial accuser, and those who covered the story. #MeToo has proven to be a powerful movement in the US. In Canada, its results have been mixed. The courtroom's rigging is one of the factors that triggered the movement in the first place.

What happens now? It remains to be seen, but the strategy is the old He-said/She-said defence, which was always a problem; on the other hand, the multi-million dollar amount isn't just a pipe dream; it is a big turn-off to Canadians who do not like those kinds of numbers in the first place...

#MeToo was never native to Canadian sensibilities, and it shows with the very different fates of two journalists on the Hitlist.

The National Post may have their whiners lamenting in columns that CTV's Paul Bliss was doomed because #MeToo is just a big old mean witch hunt ("There was no other way this story could end but in Paul Bliss being 'disappeared'", didn't you know?), but that's just a confirmation bias speaking. Steve Paikin was also accused, but he is still not "disappeared". He hosted the PC leadership debate. He is still on his show and still has his blog, with the latest entry begin on March 8. Journalists all enthusiastically marched lockstep in support of Paikin, but those same apologists stayed deafeningly silent when it came to Bliss.

So the notion that getting on that list means a foregone conclusion is highly inaccurate.

The impact of #MeToo -- a strictly Made in the USA movement has been profound in the US far more than it has in Canada. The impact on Canadian politicians has been more significant than it has on US politicians. Patrick Brown got shown to the door at lightening speed, and no one was happier than his own party. They weren't hanging their heads down in shame. They weren't condoning his alleged behaviour. They were relieved and marched on in uncharted territory moving ahead in that ensuing chaos quite cheerily.

But when it came to some other men on the list, journalists got pouty and indignant. How dare anyone accuse journalists of being less than perfect?

While the US #MeToo also enthusiastically got rid of some swamp insects in their communications, Canadian has been much slower to act, even though sexual harassment is just as prevalent here as it is over there.

Bliss was turfed, but so far, it looks like Paikin will have no trouble weathering this one out. #MeToo is not a witch hunt here, no matter what the fear-mongers decree. The US had its shock with Trump's obvious victory that they didn't see coming or had the cunning or clout to stop. Canada had no such overt reckoning to face. It is a difference in ortgeist, not zeitgeist, and why two neighbouring countries are having very different outcomes with an identical movement.

But, as usual, the National Post does not have the savvy or the sensitivity to see it.

CTV's Paul Bliss is out.

A single blog post did him in, though his own network CTV has a Canadian Press wire story (the same one other outlets are using, including the Toronto Star) about it. You'd think there would be something with more varied and original reporting, but as we do not actually have journalism anymore, it all falls to one wire service to regurgitate the press release...

CTV's Paul Bliss is suspended. Canada's fashionably late arrival on the #MeToo Movement is picking up speed.

Oh dear. CTV_logo_(1).svg

There will be squealing and howling tomorrow, I am certain.

Canadian journalists love to pretend they are perfect.

I always said journalism needed an intervention, and now we'll see where all of this domino-falling will take us...