Patrick Brown sues CTV for $8 million.

He'll never win it, however. It will be dragged through the courts for years, and the other, less savoury things will come out about him that will make his head spin.

And nothing will change.

CTV has little worry about. The PC Party was a little too happy to rid themselves of him for a reason, and they have moved on to the point that the Liberals are genuinely terrified for their fortunes. Their previous snickering and smug smirks vanished the day Doug Ford won, and they reek of fear. Brown should take a careful note and realize that Ford has what doesn't, and he's taking that with him on this doomed battle.

Brown's Alpha Male chest-thumping is meaningless, and if he is trying to salvage his dignity, that ship has sailed a long time ago...

 

CTV Vancouver fires their news anchors. Cue in the younger models...

Mike Killeen and Tamara Taggart are out at CTV Vancouver. It is unusual for a network to just oust an anchor team without the heir apparent already lined up, but Vancouver, like other Canadian cities, have seen its media get pummelled.

They've been at the helm since 2011. Unceremoniously dumping the old guard usually brings in temporary ill-will with viewers, but with television, attention spans are very short.

Their replacements will be younger -- and a lot cheaper to keep in place. I also suspect a more casual structure that is less authoritative (read: more replaceable; ergo, cannot make big salary demands because they are the draw).

The problem is that old guard aren't retaining audiences anymore. But the bigger problem is that young and diverse faces aren't stopping the erosion, either. It is the latter shift that is puzzling on the surface, but the when you have an antiquated structure and inadequate methods: it doesn't matter who is the face of the story: if their methods are deficient, there is no connect or trust. You can have a radical change on the surface, but still make no change at the core.

And nothing has changed. No innovation or true changes, and when you do not change, you are doomed to first stagnate before you decay into oblivion...

Paul Bliss sues CTV and others. Does #MeToo's power extend to the courtroom?

Former CTV reporter Paul Bliss is suing CTV, his initial accuser, and those who covered the story. #MeToo has proven to be a powerful movement in the US. In Canada, its results have been mixed. The courtroom's rigging is one of the factors that triggered the movement in the first place.

What happens now? It remains to be seen, but the strategy is the old He-said/She-said defence, which was always a problem; on the other hand, the multi-million dollar amount isn't just a pipe dream; it is a big turn-off to Canadians who do not like those kinds of numbers in the first place...

#MeToo was never native to Canadian sensibilities, and it shows with the very different fates of two journalists on the Hitlist.

The National Post may have their whiners lamenting in columns that CTV's Paul Bliss was doomed because #MeToo is just a big old mean witch hunt ("There was no other way this story could end but in Paul Bliss being 'disappeared'", didn't you know?), but that's just a confirmation bias speaking. Steve Paikin was also accused, but he is still not "disappeared". He hosted the PC leadership debate. He is still on his show and still has his blog, with the latest entry begin on March 8. Journalists all enthusiastically marched lockstep in support of Paikin, but those same apologists stayed deafeningly silent when it came to Bliss.

So the notion that getting on that list means a foregone conclusion is highly inaccurate.

The impact of #MeToo -- a strictly Made in the USA movement has been profound in the US far more than it has in Canada. The impact on Canadian politicians has been more significant than it has on US politicians. Patrick Brown got shown to the door at lightening speed, and no one was happier than his own party. They weren't hanging their heads down in shame. They weren't condoning his alleged behaviour. They were relieved and marched on in uncharted territory moving ahead in that ensuing chaos quite cheerily.

But when it came to some other men on the list, journalists got pouty and indignant. How dare anyone accuse journalists of being less than perfect?

While the US #MeToo also enthusiastically got rid of some swamp insects in their communications, Canadian has been much slower to act, even though sexual harassment is just as prevalent here as it is over there.

Bliss was turfed, but so far, it looks like Paikin will have no trouble weathering this one out. #MeToo is not a witch hunt here, no matter what the fear-mongers decree. The US had its shock with Trump's obvious victory that they didn't see coming or had the cunning or clout to stop. Canada had no such overt reckoning to face. It is a difference in ortgeist, not zeitgeist, and why two neighbouring countries are having very different outcomes with an identical movement.

But, as usual, the National Post does not have the savvy or the sensitivity to see it.

CTV's Paul Bliss is out.

A single blog post did him in, though his own network CTV has a Canadian Press wire story (the same one other outlets are using, including the Toronto Star) about it. You'd think there would be something with more varied and original reporting, but as we do not actually have journalism anymore, it all falls to one wire service to regurgitate the press release...

Patrick Brown will take his chances in court with CTV as he is being sued for defamation himself by the Premier. If he thinks her suit is just a "stunt", then what is his suit? Another stunt?

Patrick Brown is suing CTV for libel, because he claims he was wronged. Yet, just in December, he was slapped with a defamation suit from Premier Kathleen Wynne, but he dismissed that suit as a stunt.

I do not know how her suit was a stunt considering he said something that wasn't true, she demanded he correct himself, he refused, and then she warned him she would sue him for defamation, and he didn't correct himself, and then she made good on her threat (which she had done with the previous Ontario PC leader, so she was not one to just talk a good talk).

Considering the number of different sorts of accusations and internal investigations against him, he is going to have a much harder time in court than the typical man. There are too many fires, and his reputation is already in serious question, as he already comes off as something of a spoiled and conniving man-child who must be micro-managed.

As I have said before, Brown is going to be in far more serious trouble, but it isn't #MeToo that will sink him. That was just an opening salvo, and a sucker punch. The fact that it all came out before the upcoming election is interesting. The Wynne Liberals would have easily won at least a minority running against him. Wynne's numbers mean very little. Donald Trump's numbers were also nothing to write home about, but when you are running against a propped up turnip, all you need is a single catchy platform, and you can skate to victory. There are far too many teachers and civil servants who will vote Liberal no matter what. They may not like Wynne, but they like their jobs, and want to keep them just as they are.

Wynne is shrewd. She was an underdog in the Liberal leadership race. She managed to turn a minority of an unpopular regime into a majority. No one in Toronto would vote for a Barrie boy when you have one of your own in the race. No matter how bad Wynne's numbers are, she can pull a rabbit out of her hat. I have no doubt of her political acuity. Brown is no match for Wynne on any level. He needs a posse to prop him up. Wynne has her wits. She doesn't need to be liked to win, and that is a rare quality that most politicians do not possess.

Brown losing face was in the Grits' favour, but not the turns now unfolding: Ford, Mulroney, and Elliott could snatch away just enough of a base to unseat her. I wouldn't count her out if Ford (the most unlikely winner) won. I also wouldn't write her off if Elliott won. Wynne, like Jean Chretien, is, at heart, a street fighter. She plays to win, and she does her best campaigning.

I would say Mulroney would be her biggest threat, despite the fact she is a newbie on the job. So was Justin Trudeau. Canadians love brand name politicians -- even if the previous generation was reviled when leaving office. We still have interest in a British monarchy. This is the next best thing to having one. If Mulroney runs, she would handily win. In this country, pedigree trumps street smarts every time.

Wynne has a talent that shouldn't be wasted, and she ought to set her sights to a federal platform instead. The Right in this country hate her guts, and that always helps to show your own base what prowess and power you possess. At this point, she is wasting her talents. She got the brass ring here. If Brown was still in play, she could walk all over him to retain that crown.

But Brown is a sinking ship. He is not a comeback kid. It will not matter how his libel suit turns out -- win, lose, settlement -- he has too many strikes against him, and he greatly overestimates his own cunning. When the going got tough, he ran away like a scared little boy. The first reaction is the only one that counts.

As is the first reaction of his own party. The PCs has been beaming and brightly once he was kicked to the curb -- and all those so-called members he supposedly signed up are turning out to be as genuine as Twitter followers.

What has already sunk him is his own party's jubilance at his ouster. When you are in a dysfunctional free fall at the absolute worst possible time, and are happier because the previous status quo crushed your spirit -- the province reads the memo and knows exactly why it happened.

And when your own traditionalist and staid party celebrates your removal, it signals to the world about the quality of your leadership -- and hints what the rest of the province will face if you are put in charge of them also. He may believe he did nothing wrong, but his own misperceptions are blinding him to the obvious.

But not the rest of the province.

The Implosion of Patrick Brown. Offence is a terrible defence, especially when you are outgunned and outnumbered.

This column from the Globe and Mail echoes sentiments I have expressed before here, here, and here: namely that Brown has infantalized himself, revealing himself to be me-centred, has few allies in a party that was all too happy to throw him under and bus, and that while he is attacking his accusers, he is all too silent on the other problems dogging him. In the old days, a coup d'état would usually end in the dethroned leader conveniently being dispatched gorily, but this is Canada 2018, and we don't roll that way, but at a price. In a nannied society, we see the little brats for who they are really when someone takes away the paper crown and the cools toys.

Brown is behaving like an ill-behaved child in a toy store once he realizes mommy isn't going to buy him anything because they are there to buy someone else a birthday present. He once had a bland and innocuous way about him, but now the his explosive temper is coupled with excuses and finger-pointing, he is turning out to be someone very different than what he once pretended to be.

And he is showing the worst qualities a leader could possibly possess: he did not see the storm coming. He had no loyalty among the ranks with some of the most powerful members of both the federal and provincial levels distance themselves from him. He is making excuses. He obviously has never had crisis management training -- something every good leader has in emergencies, and there is always a possibility for an emergency.

He reminds me of Hillary Clinton not preparing a concession speech in the even that she lost. The fact that she didn't entertain a Plan B showed how poorly prepared she was as a leader. You don't make concession speeches because you think you are going to lose: you make them because if you are a capable leader, you have to entertain multiple scenarios because by mere randomness alone, something can come from left field. You may not be able to anticipate what bizarro thing is going to sucker punch you, but you have to be aware that you may not be able to succeed. You still need an exit strategy.

Brown's tactical errors say a lot about him. He, like Clinton, never had a vision or a plan to justify wanting the position.

But now that his stealth advantage has been lost and he now damaged goods, how he plans to win back a seat without his usual bag of tricks will be very instructive for those looking at what was transpiring during his tenure. They can compare and contrast to find out how he won the last time, and what it took, squaring it with what he is doing now.

He has been shrill and coming off as a peculiar mash-up of Mickey Mouse, Goofy, and Donald Duck. The high pitch voice, the sheltered bumbling, and the explosive temper all give off a piteous cartoonish way about him. He is not in charge. He is not shrewd. He acts entitled, and in Canadian politics, a leader does not throw temper tantrums, strut with a paper crown in public, and can never suggest that the system is flawed in any way shape, or form (Justin Trudeau's comments about the jury system has broken a spell with the public for that very reason, but that's another story).

Especially not if you were in charge. Any rot that hits you means it's your fault.

And worst of all, Brown as suddenly found the one thing to defend with his every grain of his being: himself.

If you are going to be a leader in this country, you better have something else you have a passion for, and when you don't, you will not be winning any popularity contests.

Especially if your main defence is an offence. Brown is attacking the women who accused him of being slimy. He is absolutely silent on the "rot" that has been turning up in the party, and his strategy is not one that any adept leader would stoop to using.

He is behaving like a rank amateur, making it increasingly difficult for the press here to defend someone who is not abiding by the unspoken code, and with an entire political party who do abide by it, he is alienating a base who have three luxury names they can support instead. Brown is outgunned, outnumbered, and most of all outclassed. No one wants an excitable gnat at their dinner party. He is making Doug Ford look downright stately now, doing him a huge favour. Christine Elliott and Caroline Mulroney are smart, diligent, have class, and most of all, dignity. It is the reason Elliott lost to Brown once, but now can easily enter the race once more.

Because she carefully thought about her Plan B, and proves who was the better leader for the party the last time.

I would be surprised if Mulroney doesn't win this contest. Compare her to Brown and she wins in that competition. So does Elliott, and Ford.

Brown was always a poor fit. He went for a position out of his league and it showed. Glaringly.

He is imploding as we speak. If the allegations weren't true, he had better options to confront them, but the narrative has long ago drifted away from sexual harassment to the other little problem.

The one that got the party faithful's attention and focus. As usual, he has his guard down where it counts the most, and the knock out punch is coming. This election is the Tories' to lose, and if they lose it, it will be an ugly mood -- and Brown has provided them with a perfect punching bag to take their wrath on.

 

CTV's Paul Bliss is suspended. Canada's fashionably late arrival on the #MeToo Movement is picking up speed.

Oh dear. CTV_logo_(1).svg

There will be squealing and howling tomorrow, I am certain.

Canadian journalists love to pretend they are perfect.

I always said journalism needed an intervention, and now we'll see where all of this domino-falling will take us...