Memo to the New York Times: Journalism is already dead, but do not blame the "economic model" when your problems go right into the heart of your newsrooms.

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Memo to the New York Times, that ship has sailed. Your profession rots in the ground.

There hasn’t been any journalism for a very long time. Do not blame the “economic model.” You no longer have the monopoly on communications. People prefer their own posturing and opinions than the PR firms’ scripts you all parrot.

Journalism never got empirical, and those in the business are too dense to see where they have faltered. Once upon a time, it was just philosophy until you had thinkers conduct experiments to test that philosophy.

And then psychology was born.

You would think that journalism would naturally grow in the right direction. No dice. I had a lippy editor patronize and mansplain to me how this was not possible — without any expertise, knowledge on the matter, or shred of proof.

I have over a quarter century of proof that it can be done. I conducted experiments. I studied and researched the profession inside and out. I tested my model. It is much easier to do than the clunky old ways. I tweaked and made it possible to be a portable laboratory.

If you can have entire newsroom on the smartphone, you can be a walking laboratory. I had a very lively discussion with someone about this recently, and it is funny how people outside the profession not only see the possibilities, they have suggestions and offer other proof how information becomes corrupted and tainted.

When I suggest an alternative to journalism, people first become shocked, but then excited. It requires a very special kind of training, but the old guard do not want an alternative to make them look even worse.

The reason we have no journalism is simple: journalists and their overlords are actively preventing it from happening.

But I can take them…

There is no more "great journalism". There comes a point when you have to face the truth about journalism.

Journalists are like the brat in this viral video who will eat an onion, insisting that it is an apple. [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORdkyI43IRE?rel=0]

She is suffering, but no way is she going to admit the obvious.

That's the state of journalism.

They are antiquated, reactionary, primitive, corrupted, and kaput.

So when you have a dead profession tainted by denial and narcissism, they will scream that everything is wonderful.

You see the implosion. Dean Baquet, Executive Editor of the New York Times, will talk about a "crisis" in journalism, and how this is its "Golden Age" of it.

It isn't a golden age, and we are well beyond a crisis.

When you have journalists parroting press releases, you know the profession isn't an authentic one, and when you are mandated with chronicling reality, not being authentic is a very bad thing.

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Instead of looking inward, journalists are spinning a lie about "fake news" being something outside of journalism. Nice try, but I wrote the book disproving that silly hypothesis -- three times over.

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But journalists cannot help themselves, always spinning what they do as such a wonderful and selfless thing.

The Chicago Sun-Times chirping that their rivals Chicago Tribune's drive to unionize is all about "doing great journalism" is laughable.

It is about saving their jobs, not realizing unionizing in a dead profession won't do the trick.

Journalists will put up with the stench of their profession's needless death rather than admit the obvious.

It is time for a change.

And the time is now...

New York Times' Editor's grasp of journalism is out of control: Does anyone in the business understand they are irrelevant?

Journalism collapsed because those in the business never kept up with the times. They were the gate-keepers who once held all of the cards. Social media broke down those gates, but instead of seeing the depth of seriousness of their predicament, they went on as if everything was the way it was before.

They became increasingly irrelevant until the day a newbie politician used Twitter to become president of the US, and then they were no longer part of the public discourse.

Dean Baquet of the New York Times seems completely obliviousness that the world gave the Times its redundancy papers, and has the nerve to say that Donald Trump's rhetoric on journalism is "out of control."

No, it isn't. Trump saw an opportunity, and he took full advantage of it -- and won.

He didn't need journalists' collective blessing to win.

Once upon a time, if the press didn't like you, you were done. Now, it is a badge of honour, but within the foreseeable future, no one will care about even that one way or another.

Journalism is a concept that has run its course. This is not say we no longer need people finding and disseminating facts, but the model we have now is deficient, corrupt, broken, and inadequate.

Just as j-school deans have no clue, either -- and they are training people who want to enter a dead profession. They are lecturing Sinclair Broadcasting over their little promos -- and yet, it is thanks to their short-sightedness that the profession never changed or stayed relevant.

You have a rotted system that no longer functions -- and we have people in that profession blame everyone else for their woes: Trump, Russia, Facebook, hedge funds, you name it.

They never blame themselves. They think the same scripts, hacks, and cheats still work -- and because they aren't working, they want the entire world to change back to the old ways to accommodate their own life theories.

It has gone out of control. Journalists are losing their jobs in droves -- and instead of seeing what they are doing wrong -- they are still looking for scapegoats and whipping boys to take the blame.

Nothing will change. The jobs will vanish. The outlets will close.

And they will still blame everyone else except the real culprits.

The New York Times is a concept whose time has come and gone. We do not need a paper of record -- we need people who gather facts without narrative who aren't afraid of seeing reality and truth.

That is not something you will find in a dead profession, however.

It has to be made fresh from scratch...